10 Of The World’s Least Visited Countries You Need To Explore

6. Anguilla – 69,000 Annual Visitors

10 of the World's Least Visited Countries

Anguilla’s annual tally of 69,000 sun-seeking visitors may not seem too shabby considering the island itself is only 35 square miles with a tiny population of just over 15,000 people, but once you set foot on the powdery white sand and interact with the incredibly welcoming locals, you’ll soon wonder why there isn’t an extra zero on that number. Anguilla sits in the Caribbean sea, east of popular destinations like Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, and it’s tropical locale ensures the kind of balmy temperatures perfect for year-round sunbathing and oceanfront music festivals. From the minute you arrive you’ll be on island time, the kind of slow moving, deadline-free lifestyle perfect for casually sipping a cocktail and making friends.

7. Lichtenstein – 60,000 Annual Visitors

10 of the World's Least Visited Countries

Hidden in the rolling green hills between the relatively behemoth countries of Switzerland and Austria lies the minute municipality of Liechtenstein. Never heard of it? That’s not surprising. Just 62 square miles in area, it’s the sixth smallest nation in the world, and the only one situated entirely within the Alps. Given its mountainous terrain, Liechtenstein is perfect for a ski vacation, and indeed most visitors come for the snow, but for tourists craving a little bit of history, there’s plenty of that there, too. The Liechtenstein family has ruled since at least the early 1700’s, and the current Prince Hans-Adam II heads up the constitutional monarchy. There are also wineries and art museums and the kind of scenery that makes you want to sit back and yodel, so never fear – shall you make it to the lovely land of Liechtenstein, you’ll never lack for something to do.

8. Niue – 7,000 Annual Visitors

10 of the World's Least Visited Countries

We’re pretty sure our high school graduation had more visitors than the tiny country of Niue sees in an entire year, but one trip and we’re determined to keep this hideaway a secret until the end of time. Surrounded by locales favored by experienced travels the world over (there’s New Zealand to the southwest, as well as Tonga, Samoa, and the Cook Islands), it’s easy to overlook such a tiny dot on the map, but that would be an epic mistake. The country sits on a coral atoll, basically a coral reef, and the surroundings are as exotic as they come. Sapphire blue water, waving palm trees, pristine beaches. Sadly, the limited infrastructure has lead many natives to leave in search of broader horizons, but the way of life that the remaining locals have preserved is well worth experiencing. A fun fact: though this country may be tiny and untouched in many ways, it’s the world’s first WiFi nation, meaning it provides free wireless internet access for the entire country.

9. Montserrat – 7,000 Annual visitors

10 of the World's Least Visited Countries

Montserrat’s 7,000 Annual visitors are like part of a secret club. There may not be a handshake involved, but you certainly have to be in the know to breach its oft-ignored borders. Not for lack of welcome, mind you, but for the simple reason that most of the world seems ignorant of the fact that it exists. This British Overseas Territory is part of the Lesser Antilles in the West Indies, and its isolation adds to the uniqueness of its local plant and wildlife. The Royal Botanic Gardens are a must see, and the ten native bat species makes the cave tours an exhilarating excursion. A word to the wise: the local Soufrière Hills volcano was dormant until 1995, when it woke up and spewed it’s fiery venom, forcing most of the locals to evacuate. There is an exclusion zone to protect visitors from volcanic activity, and we recommend you stick to it.

10. Kiribati – 6,000 Annual Visitors

10 of the World's Least Visited Countries

Getting to Kiribati is no small feat. The remote location (it’s about a five-hour plane ride from Hawaii) in the middle of the Pacific Ocean makes this a difficult sell for travel agents faced with hurried clients craving easy access every bit as much as they demand low-budget getaways, but what it lacks in convenience it more than makes up for in pure majesty. Kiribati is made up of 33 coral islands, each of which is shaped like a ring with a lagoon at the center, and only 21 are actually inhabited. It’s a picturesque place perfect for scuba diving, swimming, snorkeling, or just bobbing around in the water like a human rubber duck, and World War II buffs will find find something of interest as well; during the war, the Japanese used the islands as a base for their defense against American forces, and artifacts from that time are still on display.